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These 12 Simpsons Predictions Will Give You Goosebumps

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The Simpsons has made us laugh for decades. But entertainment surely isn’t the only one we can benefit from the Simpsons. This family of five has also eerily predicted stuff that more or less came true. Out of the more than 150,000 jokes, 31 seasons, and 677 episodes, these 12 Simpsons predictions will undeniably blow your mind. 

1. Obama vs. Romney votes

Homer Simpson cast a vote for Obama in a 2008 episode of The Simpsons. However, his vote glided over to McCain instead. Well, what do you know? There was also a faulty voting machine during the 2012 elections. A vote for Obama went to Mitt Romney instead!

2. Gaga’s descent at the Super Bowl

The Lisa Goes Gaga episode, where she had a cable suspension in a concert overlooking the crowd, is a premonition of Lady Gaga’s halftime show performance at the Super Bowl LI. She was also suspended by cables and descended from the roof. 

3. Horse meat parts

In the Sweet Seymour Skinner’s Badass Song episode in 1994, the cafeteria lady placed some horse meat parts in the school’s lunch pot. In 2013, there was a horse scandal in the UK, where horse DNA was discovered in beef products. 

4. Beatles letter responses

The Brush With Greatness episode showed Beatles star, Ringo Starr, responding to fan letters. He said that he doesn’t care if it took him 20 years to reply, but he’s responding to every one of them. Coincidentally, English women were ecstatic about receiving replies from Paul McCartney after 50 years!

5. Farmville fad

An episode in 1998 showed kids who were too excited to use a yard work simulator. And well, we know Farmville was all the rage in 2009. The similarity? Players tend to their farms to harvest some goods. 

6. Donald Trump 

In the 2000 episode titled Bart to the Future, Lisa was elected of the United States of America. In a cabinet meeting, she mentioned getting quite a “budget crunch” from President Trump. And true enough, Trump was elected president of the United States in 2016. 

7. Disney acquisition

In a 1998 episode, The Simpsons showed how the 20th Century Fox was an entity of Walt Disney Co. And guess what, Disney indeed acquired 21st Century Fox for $71.3 billion.

8. U.S. takes home the gold medal

Homer and Marge once represented Team USA in a mixed match curling competition, took home an Olympic gold medal, and beat Sweden. In 2018, the U.S. men’s team in curling made history as they took the Olympic gold and defeated Sweden.

9. Guitar Hero shirt

In a 2002 episode, Homer donned a shirt with a “guitar hero” print on the back. And as you know, the game Guitar hero was released in 2005. 

10. Nobel Prize winner

A 2010 episode showed Milhouse’s predictions about Bengt R. Holmstrom’s Nobel Prize award in Economics. Six years later, Holmstrom and Oliver Hart indeed won Noble Prize awards. 

11. Smartwatch creation

These Simpsons predictions are undoubtedly hair-raising due to how accurate they are. For instance, a 1995 episode showed Lisa’s husband conversing with someone from a mobile phone on his wrist. A few years later, the first smartwatch was created in 2013. 

12. Murder hornets and coronavirus coincidence

An episode in 1993 showed how a Japanese factory worker spread the “Osaka Flu” to Springfield. The people went into a state of panic and accidentally knocked over a vehicle, releasing killer bees. Bill Oakley, The Simpsons’ former writer, pointed out a shocking coincidence about the “murder hornets” in the U.S. that happened at the same time as the COVID-19 pandemic. It’s one of the many Simpsons predictions we didn’t see coming.

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How Cash-Strapped Homer Simpson Manages His Finances: A Fan Theory

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the simpsons

Have you ever wondered how a constantly broke Homer Simpson can pay for everything? In Season 8 of The Simpsons, we see a gag that may well clarify the fictional family’s unexplained wealth. Read on to learn more about a fan theory around Homer Simpson and his finances.

The Simpsons

Incorporating real, modern-day family issues into an animated world, The Simpsons has its comedic foundation on concerns such as marital woes, work-related stress, and problems concerning money. We see Homer’s struggles with his finances as an integral part of many episodes most of the time. 

In Season 8, one of the series’ strongest seasons, there is an episode wherein a throwaway gag suggests that Homer isn’t as broke as we may think. On the contrary, it implies that the family is fairly doing well financially, with no need for extra cash. 

Related Story: These 12 Simpsons Predictions Will Give You Goosebumps

Homer’s Situation

the simpsons

Only a few families of today can totally claim that money is no object, and the Simpsons are not the exception, maybe even more so as Marge is a stay-at-home wife with only Homer doing the daily grind. Although we see her working from time to time in the duration of the series, they weren’t something permanent. 

Homer’s joke of a boss, Mr. Burns, is depicted as a greedy employer who always finds ways to cut corners. One of which is his way of being stingy with his employee’s paychecks. To add more to his meager income, we see Homer taking on additional hours to be able to sustain his family’s growing needs. 

This is especially true when one of his family members gets into a new passion or hobby. One example was when Lisa got into horseback riding or when she went into musical teaching. 

Quite the Opposite

the simpsons

Even though we see Homer Simpson and his finances in such a way, we often see them spending cash like there’s no tomorrow. In Season 6’s Itchy & Scratchy Land and Season 7’s The Day The Violence Died, we find Homer dropping humongous amounts of money. A theory by Simpsons fan awkwardhipsters on Reddit says that the family’s wealth comes from a scene in Season 8’s You Only Move Twice

This episode is where Homer relocated the family to Cypress Creek to work for Hank Scorpio. He went to great lengths to work for the guy as he got along well with him. What he didn’t know was that Hank was a narcissistic, egomaniacal, and arrogant person who was bent on world domination. Unknowingly, Homer even assisted Hank in one of his evil plans, which have resulted in the death of a secret agent.

In the end, Homer takes back his family to Springfield after giving up his job with Hank. As a farewell gift, Hank bought the Denver Broncos and gave them to Homer. Hank did this after hearing that it was Homer’s dream to own the NFL’s Dallas Cowboys. 

Surprisingly, Homer was disappointed with the gift, not knowing that the Broncos would win the Super Bowl three times after this episode was aired. The team is now worth billions of dollars, even if they lack the Twitter presence of the Pittsburgh Steelers.

The Fan Theory

And so, the fan theory is that Homer still owns a part of the team, the reason he seems to spit out money whenever he can. This may also explain how Homer can afford to send Lisa to an Ivy League school, as can be seen in Season 29’s Mr. Lisa’s Opus.

In addition, this may be why the family seems to have a limitless bank account. They never lost their house, they can easily pay for Homer’s never-ending injuries and his excessive time off from work.

And for other entertainment stories, read more here at Owner’s Mag!

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Review: We’re All Going to the World’s Fair

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Jane Austen’s Northanger Abbey tells the story of a girl whose perception of reality is warped by her love of Gothic novels. Austen deftly weaves Gothic tropes into her writing before coming to a controlled, romantic ending. 

But how does the evolution from Gothic into horror affect that narrative? What about post-Blair Witch grassroots horror? How would Catherine Morland respond to the blurred line between horror and reality in our fragmented online culture? Enter We’re All Going to the World’s Fair.

Perhaps the greatest testament to World’s Fair is the personal memories it seems to bring out in its audience. Scroll through Letterboxd and you’ll find reflections on cryptic YouTube messages, creepy chatroom encounters, and friends who poured hand sanitizer in each other’s eyes.

Personally, I was too anxious a kid to get involved in the sort of horror ARG that this film’s protagonist, Casey (Anna Cobb), does. Still, anyone who was raised in the ‘00s or ‘10s knows about this sort of online supernaturalism. I knew my fair share of kids who got invested in the paranormal like Casey. At the very least, I was quite familiar with Creepypastas, which this film references explicitly.

What makes this film feel so personal is the online intimacy of its storytelling. With rare exceptions, World’s Fair is told entirely through YouTube-style videos. Even when Casey isn’t on-screen, we’re with her. 

The only true break from this is at the end, when JLB (Michael J. Rogers), the only other credited actor, gets a scene and a half of his own. His “other” is also a strikingly relatable one. Like any strange adult you interact with online as a child, he can be viewed either as a concerned guardian or another supernatural threat.

Not unlike Austen, writer-director Jane Schoenbrun is a formal virtuoso. She prepares an uncanny charcuterie board of internet horror ranging from 8-bit “found footage” to VFX-driven short films. 

Alex G’s score sets a chilling tone, as does Cobb’s refreshingly weird performance, but often the scariest part of the movie is the silent, rotating arrow that plays between videos. It reminds us that we’re watching from someone’s point of view, of the sensation of being held captive by late-night horror rabbit holes.

At the time, I felt a bit disappointed by the film’s optimistic, reality-check ending. Like Casey, I had been swept up in the game. As horrific and seemingly deadly as it was, I wanted to believe. It took me a few days to recognize that the film isn’t from Casey’s perspective; it’s JLB, watching Casey’s videos. That’s why we never see Casey outside of this altered, late-night state. We never know her family, her school, or her interests. Near the end of the film, we realize we might never have known her at all.

We’re All Going to the World’s Fair’s creepy, voyeuristic horror is closely tethered to our strange reality. It’s not just based on a true story, it’s based on a billion true stories. If you were raised on the internet, you may uncover one of your own.
We’re All Going to the World’s Fair is now playing at PFS Bourse and available for digital download.

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How To Survive The 5-Minute Internet Fads

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hand on plate

Since 2015, Tasty’s has featured hands preparing recipes for goodies like cheese-stuffed mashed potato balls. Tasty is a division of Buzzfeed that produces and shares content about comfort food. Each of their recipes is uploaded on their Facebook page and YouTube channel. Some of them have become part of today’s internet fads. 

Surprisingly, these “hands and pans” videos helped shape the internet as we witness nowadays. 

Tasty’s DNA is now in the TikTok food cravings for pizza or baked feta pasta. People sharing social media videos of hands-focused tasks like household cleaning or organizing drew inspiration from Tasty. So did the 2020 craze of knives cutting into a cake that looked like a Crocs shoe or a pickle. That video amassed almost 30 million views as people began sharing their version of awesome cake videos. 

Mainly, these internet fads helped establish smartphone videos as a primary tool that we interact via screens. The influence of Tasty might be everywhere online, but that doesn’t mean that it is easy for Tasty itself. 

The Tasty Overhaul and the Challenges To Keep Up With Internet Fads

Recently, the food entertainment website is revamping itself to lean into our 2022 habits. Aside from that, Tasty is also enhancing its app and business strategy. Their transformation will satisfy the constantly evolving food novelties and efforts to create our recipes. 

The BuzzFeed general manager responsible for the Delicious brand, Hannah Bricker, said that Tasty was confident with the quick-hearth churns of their endeavors and patterns. 

“Iteration is a component of our DNA. It’s been a technique ever since the beginning.” – Hannah Bricker. 

For example, in its app, Delicious is adding features to let people swap their recipes. Also, they are incorporating cook-together troubles for women and men preparing food online alongside one another. Bricker explained that people seemed to want additional individual interaction during the pandemic. They want to contribute alternatively rather than just acquiring recipes given to them. 

With so many online meals video clips on TikTok, Tasty is also teaming up with newbie video clip creators. For instance, in an arrangement with the supply application Instacart, dozens of TikTok creators will be equipped to publish Delicious recipes in just the TikTok application. Then viewers have the choice to buy the ingredients from Instacart’s application. Tasty has an identical arrangement with Walmart.

Bricker explained Tasty’s technique not as chasing every on net meals fad or the whims of popular applications but as embracing these in its primary id all around owning pleasurable foods. “Food is universal and private, long-lasting,” she mentioned.

The challenge for Tasty and many other brands is staying relevant and fresh at the fast speed internet fads when the only thing sure is change.

Tasty.co Milestones

Tasty’s Facebook page, created on July 31, 2015, has over 106 million followers. Their videos have received over 5 billion views as of April 3, 2021, and are the main content of that site. A video featuring pizza puff pastry twists has been watched more than 146 million times.

Tasty has four segments of recipes. Tasty Junior is for children. On the other hand, Tasty Happy Hour is for adults, with most of the recipes being alcoholic beverages. They also have Tasty Story and Mom vs. Chef segments. 

The Tasty YouTube channel was created on January 22, 2016. Their most viewed video, titled “I Went To Japan To Make The Most Difficult Omelet,” has garnered over 16.2 million views.

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