Connect with us

Featured

Voi and Luna collaborate to launch e-scooter trials

Published

on

Swedish e-scooter startup Voi Technology is teaming up with Dublin-based micro-mobility startup Luna in an effort to change the way we travel. Voi and Luna aim to improve safety by using computer vision technology to prevent pavement riding and increase pedestrian detection.

In 2019, electric scooters saw a boost in use as more people have taken to this new and novel way to get around. This need for mobility, especially during the pandemic, is currently trending, urging the mobility industry to remodel and innovate.

Voi and Luna: The Technology

Luna’s technology focuses on offering real-time lane segmentation and pedestrian detection for e-scooters. The same innovation as what you can find in high-end cars. Founded in 2019 in Dublin, Ireland, Luna explores the ways technology can advance how people move in urban settings.

On the other hand, Voi operates the e-scooter hire service in Cambridge. Their scooters use technology that equips them with tools that identify loopholes and adapt to micro-mobility. They do this by conveying real-time data on how the vehicles are being used.

Together, the two tech companies are launching a pilot program. It will explore the use of computer vision to keep riders and pedestrians safe from pavement riding and collisions. On July 7, Voi tested their e-scooters on the streets of Stockholm and will continue with the deployment in Northampton by the end of this month. 

Their goal is to develop e-scooters that can detect when their riders drive them on the pavements instead of roads. These scooters will have smart cameras that these two entities developed jointly. These cameras will track the environment where they are being ridden and give alerts when they’re parked incorrectly or in an unsuitable location.

Voi announced that the scooters would sound alarms as soon as it detects someone rides them. Using the data they gathered from the tests, the scooters will automatically slow down. In addition, the scooters will guide their riders to park in virtual racks that they designate. This is to avoid the riders from blocking the pavements or the bike racks.

The Trial

Before this month ends, Voi will be starting the first phase of the trial. They will be testing on a controlled user group in Northampton, where they have an exclusive license to operate. As of this writing, Voi is unable to operate in Ireland due to regulatory barriers that are in place. They have already expressed the intention of doing so when the country amends the law. In February of this year, the Irish government passed their approval on a plan to allow e-scooter use on Irish roads.

In the second phase, Voi will be installing around 100 cameras on e-scooters that are currently in use by the public. After completing the trials, Luna’s technology will then be incorporated in Voi’s e-scooters available for public use.

The intelligent cameras will use Edge AI that can detect and recognize pedestrians in its field of view and count them. These are GDPR compliant, so there are no recording of faces or images of people taken to protect privacy.

The Future of E-Scooters

According to Voi Technology’s CEO and co-founder, Fredrik Hjelm, the project aims to improve the safety of e-scooter riders. They will tackle the two most common issues they face: pavement riding and pedestrian detection. Pedestrians, especially those with vulnerabilities such as compromised visions, will also benefit from the trials. 

The Voi and Luna collaboration will hopefully address and provide solutions to most of the concerns the public has with scooter riding.

Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Featured

Near Space Labs Eyeing To Capture All of Earth

Published

on

What do climate change, traffic, and the military have in common? The need for geospatial intelligence. Anyone involved in these fields will need reliable and high-quality imagery to observe trends and use analytics to better and advance their fields. One company, in particular, aims to provide high-quality geospatial imagery at an affordable price. Near Space Labs is the name, and democratizing geospatial intelligence imagery is the game. Read more about them here.

What Does Near Space Labs Do?

Founded by Rema Matevoysan, Ignasi Lluch, and Albert Caubet, Near Space Labs is a geospatial intelligence company. Their mission is to provide high-quality images for organizations involved in the government, insurance, military, climate change, and urban planning fields.

They’ve been operational since 2016, although they were named Swiftera at the time. Since then, they’ve revolutionized the geospatial field, providing clearer images and access to data.

Unlike other geospatial intelligence companies, Near Space Labs is committed to reducing emissions with their balloon fleet.

Their platform takes images anywhere, and data collected by their Swifties can be viewed with anyone who has a subscription with Near Space Labs. Data is not exclusive to any business or company, which anyone can use for whatever purpose. 

One area of land they focus on capturing is urbanized areas. After all, you’ll see more changes in urbanized land, and they aim to give updated data to anyone who needs access to it. Matevosyan revealed in an interview that she preferred providing imagery for municipalities and businesses. The images can be valuable for weather-related events and faster response to disasters.

The Swifty Balloon

Capturing images from a high altitude can become expensive. But Near Space Labs have come up with a weather balloon, they named Swifty. Technically, Swifty is their “autonomous high altitude platform.” It can go as high as 85,000 feet to capture images and capture, at the most, 1,000 km worth of imagery in one flight.

However, they work alongside the Federal Aviation Administration to ensure they don’t violate any airspace laws.

Currently, the Swifties have captured over 600,000 images and have taken 300,000 km2 worth of images captured from the stratosphere. Plus, it has logged over 600 hours worth of flight. The company has over eight Swifties in operation.

What Makes Swifty Different?

Aside from affordable rates, Near Space Labs takes 50x clearer photos than any satellite. Not only that, considering they use balloons, they have a plug-and-play model. This gives them an opportunity to iterate technology, something satellites cannot do since they’re in orbit.

How Have Near Space Labs Thrived During the Pandemic?

Although many businesses have faced challenges during the height of the pandemic, the geospatial startup found an opportunity to capture images from anywhere. That’s without the need for the staff or founders to fly to a location. They can ship the Swifty and include a manual to train someone to launch their robot into the stratosphere.

In 2020, they were planning to expand to Texas. It was a smooth ride for them to expand to the state and even set up a technical team to launch Swift there.

Plus, considering they offer a cost-effective solution than other geospatial organizations, many companies have expressed an interest in using their data. The conservation field, in particular, has spiked its applications in 2020.

Funding and Future of Near Space Labs

Crosslink Capital, Toyota Ventures, Leadout Capital, and Wireframe Ventures contributed to the $13M in funding Near Space Labs received for their Series A round. This funding can help them with capturing more imagery for governments and organizations needing data and analytics. Plus, with what they’ve earned so far, Near Space Labs aims to invest in getting new hires.

Not only that, but they have booked 540 flights until 2022! Expect more Swifties to float in the air.

For other tech and startup stories, check out Owner’s Mag!

Continue Reading

Featured

Afraid of Robots Taking Jobs? Don’t Be. Here’s Why

Published

on

One particular paper in 2013 caught the attention of many Internet users that jobs can be automated by robots. And that has made any working person dread losing their job to robots. The robot takeover may seem like it’s in its infancy stages; what people should remember about some robots taking jobs is they’re taking over ones we DON’T want to do. At least, that’s it for now.

Let’s take a look at what robots have been doing now and how they can help automate tasks in the future.

Fear of Robots Taking Jobs

Now that robots have slowly taken part in the workforce, many worry, especially millennials, that they can lose their jobs within the next five years.

That said, the future may look bleak for workers that are already competing with robots in the workplace. But robots can also become advantageous in making our lives easier. Plus, they can even give us insight into the unfamiliar territory before robots become fully integrated into our workforce.

Coronavirus

When Covid-19 hit globally, it was challenging for humans to be in close contact with one another. After all, people wanted to reduce the spread of the virus. Unfortunately, due to the virus, many have lost their jobs to the pandemic. While that’s the reality, robots have been essential to helping humans live their lives.

For example, a city in the UK employed the help of robots to deliver items. Although this is a prime example of robots taking jobs, robots help expedite deliveries and reduce the spread of the virus. Think of the robots as stand-ins for contactless deliveries.

Another example that stands out is Japan. The land of the rising sun is no stranger to using robots. 

The need for robots has increased, considering the aging population. And the pandemic has accelerated the demand to add robots to the workforce. The food industry, in particular, has reaped the benefits of using robots. One restaurant has used robots as part of their service crew, and they aim to bring food to the table faster than humans.

Space Exploration

When it comes to space exploration, humankind has left its mark and took a big leap on the moon. Since then, there have been no missions going to other planets. However, there are plans for humans to explore Mars. As big a feat this is, it’s unclear if Mars’s atmosphere and environment are safe for humans.

But to give us context on life on Mars, NASA’s rovers help us gain more insight into the red planet. From there, they can help humankind to determine if it’s safe to explore the red planet.

Construction

One industry has benefited from using robots in the workforce. 

The Boston Dynamics robotic dog has helped project managers in construction expedite their work. So far, the robot has done inspections and documentation work for project managers. This is a prime example of robots not taking someone’s job but helping humans, making processes smoother and faster.

The Future of Robots and Automation

The future is bright for robots. CNBC reported that over 20 million robots may replace humans in the workforce by 2030. Manufacturing is an industry that will be hit the most if this happens.

But, if you’re paranoid that a robot will take over your job sometime in the future, here’s a website that calculates the risk of robots taking jobs from humans. Most jobs do have a low risk of getting automated, like creatives, lawyers, and doctors in specific fields. 

However, it’s important to remember that robots are the best at automation. Sure, they can make life easier for humans, but they’re not 100% replacing all the jobs in the workforce. Simply put, their job is to help humans automate some everyday tasks to ensure maximum productivity and input. And they can help out with documentation and data that can take time to be processed by humans.

Continue Reading

Featured

Electronic Monitoring is Restrictive – Researchers Say

Published

on

According to new research, electronic monitoring is one of the most restrictive forms of control. This comes as a mere second to prison and considered as a form of incarceration that occurs outside of its walls.

The coronavirus pandemic has led the judicial system to come up with a new form of monitoring inmates. They have turned more to electronic monitoring, such as those attached to ankles. This confirms the long-standing arguments of activists and advocates alike: electronic monitoring is oppressively burdensome. They see it as subjecting inmates to vague rules and seemingly branding them as people with “disreputable character.”

Ankle Monitor Manufacturers

The same research also tells us that only four ankle monitor manufacturers dominate the industry. They believe that this will drive more people to go back to prison. These profit-seeking companies make millions in dollars annually for a whopping 64% of the contracts included in the study. 

This comes from the new and complete compilation of numerous electronic monitoring-related rules and policies, and contracts. All were gathered from public records and requests from 44 states. According to the report, the companies are: 

  • Attenti
  • BI Inc.
  • Satellite Tracking of People LLC
  • Sentinel Offender Services LLC

Privacy and Security Issues Related to Electric Monitoring

The study also found that location data was kept indefinitely after monitoring, although all within the law. Governments ask family members and employers to act as their agents to report potential violations. This may seem awkward as they will have the task of being in a supporting role as well as supervisory.

It is of utmost importance that inmates who wear the ankle monitors pay one-time and ongoing fees for these monitors. Said amount can be anywhere from $25 up to $8,000 each year. The research sees these as costs that undermine financial security “when it is needed most.”

On the other hand, the Justice Department’s Bureau of Prisons claimed that in 2018, it only costs under $100 per day or over $36,000 per year to detain a federal inmate. California, particularly the Los Angeles and Sacramento counties pay $22 each day. This is due to the fact that these counties impose the highest costs yearly. 

Kate Weisburd, associate professor of law at George Washington University, has this to say about this:

“This is a form of incarceration that happens outside of prison walls.” Weisburd was the team lead of a group of 10 law students who analyzed and filed the documents. She added, “It’s always intended to be a positive alternative to incarceration. But based on what we found, it’s doing the opposite. More rules and more surveillance generally leads to higher incarceration.”

Compliance and Violations

The report also tells us that electronic monitoring follows hundreds of government rules that make compliance even more difficult. Add to that the vague rules that make it even harder. An excellent example of this is the Alabama Bureau of Pardons and Parole’s mandate that wearers “shall abandon evil associates and ways.”

According to Weisburd’s study, the results are open to interpretation, making the wearers vulnerable to technical violations of the rules. Wearers may face punishment for infractions that were once ignored and unseen.

Most cases of electronic monitoring, though, have uses in house arrests. This means that wearers must remain in or near their homes for a specific period. Weisburd’s team gathered that many agencies fail to explain clearly the permissions that they require. 

Weisburd also proceeded to state that every record they looked into had a negative impact. These undermine people’s capability of surviving outside of prison. It has become more difficult with rules to follow that are vague and broad.

For other stories, check out more here on Owner’s Mag.

Continue Reading

Trending